Day 1 - 20th May 1999

0930

 

WELCOME & INTRODUCTION

1000

 

Phil
Lawman
Hewlett
Packard

THOSE ELUSIVE ORDERS

A Cliffhanger’s Guide to selling education.

How do we sell education, what are the routes to market, what is an ideal sales model, who do we sell to, what are the barriers to success both inside and outside your company?

This is an interactive session using the HP model as a framework for discussion that will hopefully give all participants some ideas to explore within their own organisations.

1115

COFFEE
.

1130 

Steve Moody
Cognos

&

Melanie
Wood
Siebel
Systems

UK Limited

PROMOTING CUSTOMER TRAINING in a SOFTWARE BUSINESS

This session considers two common dilemmas for Training Managers in the software industry: how do we motivate both licence and training sales people to sell training? and how can we show that selling more training pays off in more licence sales?

Drawing on the experiences of the applications sector and the software tools sector, the session questions what techniques and incentives we can use to boost training sales motivation, and what techniques and metrics we can use to prove the wider benefits of maximising customer training.

1300
 

LUNCH

1400
Norbert
Alexy
Siemens

HOW CAN YOU ADD VALUE TO YOUR TRAINING OFFERINGS?

This session is meant to be an open discussion about different concepts and strategies to make training more attractive and valuable to the customer and therefore more valuable to the provider.

In order to trigger discussion, Norbert will present the Siemens approach of integrating Training Services into the delivery of business solution packages. Training is thus transformed from a standard off-the-catalogue service into an indispensable customer specific building block of a value chain, a critical success factor in the introduction of a new technology into an enterprise.

1515 
 
TEA

1530

Ferry
Kubatz
IBM

YEAR 2000 – THE IMPACT ON I.T. TRAINING IN LATE 1999 & EARLY 2000
The Year 2000 will hopefully provide many  opportunities for the I.T. Training Industry. What will happen in the second half of 1999 and first half of 2000? Will students enrol on public courses? What kind of students will need training during this period of uncertainty? Will companies put a freeze on training or will they freeze system changes and step up their training activity? This will be an interactive session that should help all of us to prepare for one of the most uncertain years ever for our industry.

 

 

Day 2 - 21st May 1999

 0900

Sarah Perry
Oracle

THE ROLE OF BUSINESS PARTNERS

Business Partners have become significant players in the increase of software sales and implementations. This session discusses how they impinge on the training world in the areas of:

  • how to train them on our product
  • their role as training sales agents
  • their role as contact trainers
  • their role as training partners

1030

 

COFFEE

1045

Adrian
Agostini
Oracle

TUTOR – A NEW APPROACH TO END USER TRAINING

This session addresses the following topics relating to training in the End User marketplace: End User Training in the implementation lifecycle of ERP Applications, Just-In-Time/Just-Enough training and job-related/role based training.

The Tutor architecture is explained as is the authoring tool, online repository, documentation of business processes, curriculum planning and the publishing of end user training materials with Tutor.

1230

 

LUNCH

1330

All

NEXT CONFERENCE

Delegates vote on the topics to be addressed at the next conference.

1430

 

COFFEE

1445

 

PULSE OF THE INDUSTRY

All companies are asked to give their views of current issues and future trends.

20th - 21st May 1999

IBM Education

Utrecht, The Netherlands

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